December-January 2017

Are we getting used to seismic political events? It begins to seem so. The ‘no’ result in the Italian referendum on December 4 wasn’t seismic exactly, but the reaction to it from investors was definitely more muted than it might have been had they not already had to metabolise Brexit and president-elect Trump.

Donald Trump’s victory has fund managers gripping their seats. The only question is ‘what next?’ Fiona Rintoul asks fund managers for their thoughts.

Against the recent emerging markets revival, the number of Brics fund closures has increased. Kit Klarenberg asks if this suggests developing regions are no longer worthy of investors’ attention.

Adeline Ng, head of Asia fixed income for BNP Paribas Investment Partners, discusses Asia’s bond markets in light of Trump’s victory.

Asian local currency bonds have offered a yield pick-up over US treasury bonds this year. However, following the US election, David Stevenson asks if investors still have the risk appetite for the asset class.

2016 was the year emerging markets returned to the spotlight, as they regained ground since the 2012 sell-off. Funds Europe asked our panel if this appetite will persist in 2017.

Following the FTSE upgrade of Palestine to frontier market status, Fiona Rintoul speaks to Palestinian and Israeli investors who let business rather than politics lead them.

The Mutual Recognition of Funds scheme was a hot topic of discussion at an asset management briefing in Hong Kong. Alan Chalmers reports.

In our final survey of fund professionals’ attitudes towards emerging markets in conjunction with Amundi, investors seem certain about which regions and assets offer the best opportunities – and the best way to access them.

Jeff Conway, regional chief executive for State Street, talks to David Stevenson about regulation and how the firm will handle the challenge of tech disruption.

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