April 2012

Canary-WharfThe Financial Services Authority (FSA) moved to its “twin peaks”model from the beginning of this month as it further readied itself to split into two new regulatory bodies.

Coffee_shop_menuThe Pankow district of Berlin is always a good place to spot informative graffiti, but my most recent sighting on Wolankstraße takes the biscuit. Freiheit ist Terror! it read. It is a peculiarly German turn of phrase that verges on the untranslatable. Suffice to say that Freiheit means freedom.

Viking_shipThe Nordic countries, with the exception of Iceland, have emerged as a relatively safe haven during the eurozone crisis. Many say this fiscal strength is due to reforms made after a banking crisis in the early 1990s, finds George Mitton.

Boat_houseInstitutions in the Nordics have not outsourced as much as in other regions, but they are showing more interest now that regulation is becoming more complex. George Mitton reports.

The asset servicing industry in the Nordics is fiercely competitive, though increased demand for compliance and consulting services means there are business opportunities. But it’s all hands on deck to deal with the waves of regulation ready to hit the industry.

Euro_signThe European bond investor’s world has completely changed thanks to the crisis, finds Fiona Rintoul. But there still are pockets of value and safety.

Gold_barsThe gold price is frustrating asset allocators following a volatile few months, Michael Gordon, of BNP Paribas Investment Partners, tries to make sense of it.

ClockworksOperational outsourcing is thriving among asset managers but much less popular for pension funds. Nicholas Pratt examines why this is the case.

Outsourcing is not new to pension funds.

BookmarksThe time when fund administrators did only fund administration is in the distant past, finds Nicholas Pratt, in an introduction to this year’s survey of third-party providers, which includes our annual directory.

bookmarks_zoomedNet inflows for third-party fund administrators are half what they were on the previous twelve months, finds Nicholas Pratt.

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